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Things Not To Do in the Dojo

In the Hikari Dojo you should not:

Become angry. You should remain calm and collected at all times.

Curse. You should always speak in a polite manner.

Talk loudly, unless you have been asked to lead a group or count. You should always maintain composure.

Speak negatively of another martial artist or martial art. See: Something Nice To Say.

Daydream. You must concentrate on training and maintain a heightened state of awareness.

Have dirty fingernails or toenails. They can cause infection of you accidentally cut another student.

Men should not have long fingernails or toenails. They can cut another student. You should have a fingernail cutter in your carry bag.

Drink alcohol or come to the dojo after drinking alcohol.

Smoke.

Chew gum or eat candy. You could choke on them.

Wear shoes or slippers. They should be lined up neatly outside the dojo or placed in your carry bag.

Wear a dirty or stinky gi. You should be considerate of others.

Wear jewelry of any kind. They could cut another student or get snagged, injuring you.

Wear make-up. It can run and get in your eyes, distracting you.

Horseplay. Do not play around in the dojo. Do not throw balls or ride bicycles or skateboards in the dojo.

Pick up another person's weapon unless you have first obtained permission.

Come to the dojo if you are ill. You might infect others. Return to the dojo when you have fully recovered.

Come to the dojo if you are taking medication that makes you drowsy or unbalanced (dizzy). Return to the dojo when are healthy.

Continue training if you feel ill, especially if you are short of breath, dizzy, feel like you have to vomit, or feel like you have to use the restroom. You should step out and ask the sensei for assistance. All students should be watchful of any students showing any signs of illness or imminent collapse.

Come to the dojo if you should be working or doing homework. You should only come to the dojo after you have attended to all other responsibilities.

Think about work or school -- concentrate on training. Leave the world in your slippers.

As students we should always try our best.

Respectfully,

Charles C. Goodin