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Boiling Water

There was a cook who needed to bring a pot of water to a boil for his recipe. However, every few minutes he would pour out half of the water and refill the pot with cold water. As a result, the water would never boil.

Karate is like this. You have to give the water time to boil. If you keep adding new things, you will only be lukewarm.

Why do some people constantly dilute their Karate with other things -- other kata, other styles, whatever is popular at the time?

If your Karate curriculum is sufficiently complete, it will "boil" if you give it enough time. However, if you have not learned a sufficiently complete system, no amount of heat will cause your Karate to "boil."

So what is "sufficiently complete?" This is hard to say. It is easier to say what is not. If your Karate does not provide good results, despite long term, diligent effort, and if your technique becomes worse with age rather than better, then you might have learned a system that is not sufficiently complete. This is easy to have done, given the many times in Karate history when the art was compressed or limited to teach school students, university students, military draftees, foreigners (with limited time to train), etc., and modified for tournaments. Each time the art was reduced, it became less complete and the chance of "boiling" also was reduced.

Let me give you another example. It is necessary to learn the alphabet in order to communicate in writing. However, repeating the alphabet thousands of times will not help you to form words and sentences, and to write freely. The alphabet, by itself, is not a complete system. It is a necessary part, but not the whole thing.

Alphabet Karate is not complete either. No amount of repeating it will yield transformational (boiling) results.

If you practice a complete system, give it time. With your diligent effort and sufficient time, you will be amazed at the results! Don't dilute your Karate. Give it a chance to boil!

Respectfully,

Charles C. Goodin