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Weight Placement and Pivoting -- Part 5

As you move forward, there is another consideration (in addition to unintended side to side movement).

If you move from a low stance to a higher stance, you put more weight on your feet.

If you move from a high stance to a lower stance, you take weight off your feet.

Try it. It helps to move briskly.

I want to repeat this because it is so important:

If you move from a low stance to a higher stance, you put more weight on your feet.

If you move from a high stance to a lower stance, you take weight off your feet.
This applies whether you are standing still or moving. When you move up (rise), you press down. When you move down (sink or drop), you weigh less.

This affects how you can pivot on your feet. When there is more weight on your feet, it is more important to pivot on the ball of your foot or heel. It is hard to pivot on the center of the foot. When there is less weight on your feet, you can pivot more freely -- on the ball, heel, or on the center of your foot.

There is another consideration. When you move up (rise), there is a moment at the top of the movement when you become lighter. At that moment, you are less stable (unless you also have movement is a horizontal direction).

Try this. Stand comfortably. Now jump up a couple of inches. At first, you press down on your feet. But at the top of your jump, you become weightless for a moment. And then the weight returns to your feet.

The opposite is also true. When you move down (drop or sink), initially there is less weight on your feet for a moment, but then there is more weight, followed by a bounce (momentarily slightly less weight). It is good to move when there is less weight on your feet and good to strike when there is more.

So the timing of your movement (in the horizontal plane) and the effectiveness of certain techniques are great affected by vertical movement (rising or sinking).

In fact, vertical movement can and is used in our Kishaba Juku form of Shorin-Ryu to initiate movement or boost the power of techniques. I am sure that it is used in other styles as well. But in Kishaba Juku, vertical movement is elevated to an invisible "ballet" of sorts that takes place during and in between all of our movements. We are always moving in three dimensions, externally and internally. (By internally, I mean inside our body -- not metaphysically.)

Respectfully,

Charles C. Goodin